A Tribute to the CU Senior Class of 2014

Note: The University of Colorado lists 21 seniors on its roster. Some have been starters for most of their careers, while others have never started a game as a Buff. Regardless of their on field contribution, these 21 future Buffs-4-Life have given their all to their team, and deserve recognition.

These players all have two things in common. First, they will finish their careers without ever playing in a bowl game (the third straight Class with that ignoble distinction); but second, they are all on pace to graduate. Two have already graduated, six more will graduate this December, with the remainder slated for graduation next spring or summer.

Note: The 2010 – 2013 career highlights for each player courtesy of the roster section at cubuffs.com

Thank you, seniors!

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JARED BELL – Defensive BackNote: Bell will be petitioning the NCAA for a sixth-year of eligibility

Recruiting: Bell was rated as a three-star prospect out of the Class of 2010 by Rivals. Bell, who played in Ontario, California, was considered to be the 76th-best prospect out of California that year, and the 34th-best cornerback in the nation.

Graduation Status: Has already graduated with a degree in Sociology. He has been accepted for graduate school, one of the requirements for petitioning the NCAA for his sixth year of eligibility.

Career at Colorado:

2014 (Sr.) – Bell suffered a torn ACL in practice on August 15th. He underwent surgery, and will be petitioning the NCAA for a sixth year of eligibility.

2013 (Jr.) – He played in all 12 games (11 starts), finishing fourth on the team in total tackles with 67 (48 of the solo variety).  He had four for losses, two stops for zero gain and seven third down stops to go with seven touchdown saves, six passes broken up, three interceptions, two forced fumbles and a recovery.  He returned one of the interceptions and the fumble for touchdowns, both key plays when they occurred.  He was the player of the week in the state as selected by the Colorado chapter of the National Football Foundation for his efforts against USC, when he had six tackles, five solo including one for a loss, and a forced fumble in which he returned 31 yards for a touchdown that got the Buffaloes on the scoreboard for the first time on the opening play from scrimmage in the second half.  He was also CU’s athlete of the week for Sept. 2-8, when he had a then-career-high eight tackles (seven solo), and a big 79-yard interception return for a touchdown that tied the game early in the fourth quarter in an eventual 38-24 win over Central Arkansas.  He had a career-high 10 tackles against Cal (six solo), and had nine versus Arizona (seven solo, also adding an interception); his other pick came against Charleston Southern.  He added five more tackles (all solo, one inside-the-20) on special teams duty, where he racked up eight points in all, as he also had a downed punt and a forced fair catch.

2012 (Soph.) – He played in all 12 games, including eight on defense and two starts, which came against Washington State and UCLA.  In 201 plays from scrimmage, he had 13 tackles, eight solo with two for losses, a third down stop and a fumble recovery.  He also had his first career interception, making it early in the WSU game; it saved a score as he picked it off at the CU 3 and returned it 37 yards.  He had two tackles in four different games and had two knockdown blocks on special teams duty.  He missed spring drills as he continued rehabilitation from knee surgery, but was 100 percent by August drills.

2011 (Soph.-RS) – Redshirted due to injury; he entered the fall listed third at right cornerback and with most spots and the nickel back up for grabs, he figured into the mix at both safety and cornerback.  But in the third practice (Aug. 6), he suffered a knee injury (torn ACL), underwent surgery (Aug. 26) and was lost for the season.

2010 (Fr.) – He saw action in all 12 games, eight on defense including one start (versus Baylor).  In 54 plays from scrimmage, he posted 11 tackles, seven solo, with the bulk coming in the Baylor game when he racked up a season-high nine, seven of which were unassisted.  He also added five tackles, four solo, on special teams coverage duty, and was one of just seven true freshmen to play for the Buffs in the 2010 season.

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BRANDON BRISCO – Defensive Back

Recruiting: Was not recruited as part of the Class of 2011. Joined the team as a walk-on from Oakland, California, after the 2011 season began.

Graduation Status: Brisco is on pace to graduate next May with a degree in Political Science.

Career at Colorado:

2014 (Jr.) – Brisco has dressed for all but one game (UMass) this season, and has played in the last two games (Arizona; Oregon). Brisco would have another year of eligibility, but has opted to complete his football career this fall.

2013 (Soph.) – A reserve cornerback, he did not see any action, but dressed for the final 11 games of the season.  He had five tackles (three solo, including a third down stop) and a pass broken up in the four main spring scrimmages.

2012 (Fr.-RS) – He did not see any action; he did dress for the last two games of the season.  He had five tackles (four solo) in the main spring scrimmages.

2011 (Fr.) – Red-shirted; practiced at defensive back in the fall.  He joined the team as a walk-on after the season opener.

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WESLEY CHRISTENSEN – Wide Receiver

Recruiting: Christiansen came to Colorado as a walk-on transfer from Butte Community College in California.

Graduation Status: Christiansen is on pace to graduate next May with a degree in Geology.

Career at Colorado:

2014 (Sr.) – Christiansen has played in every game this fall, mostly on special teams. He has posted eight special team points, including seven knockdown or springing blocks on kick returns.

2013 (Jr.) – He saw limited action in 11 games, primarily on special teams (he did not play at UCLA).   He caught four passes for 30 yards in the four main spring scrimmages.  He transferred to CU from Butte College for the spring semester and joined the team as a walk-on; he had three years to play two in eligibility.

AT BUTTE (2011/2012, Fr./Soph.) – He earned two letters at wide receiver and long snapper for Butte College in Oroville, Calif., helping his team to a 10-1 record both seasons and the 2012 NorCal Championship.  Butte, under coach Jeff Jordan, was the second ranked team in the nation his sophomore year, when he caught 11 passes for 148 yards (13.4 per) and a touchdown.  He also threw one pass, completing it for 28 yards and a TD.  As a freshman, he hauled in nine passes for 150 yards (16.7) and a score.

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BRAD COTNER – Offensive Lineman

Recruiting: Cotner was an unrated offensive lineman. He did not sign with the Buffs until June of 2011. Cotner does have a year of eligibility left, but has decided to forego his final year, and end his career with his graduation this December.

Graduation Status: Cotner will be graduating this December with a degree in Political Science

Career at Colorado:

2014 (Jr.) – Cotner was injured during the first month of the season, but has dressed for the last six games, getting in for the UCLA game.

2013 (Soph.) – He saw action in seven games (no starts), dressing for all except for the Arizona game, when he was held out due to precautionary reasons with an ankle sprain.  He was in for 63 snaps from scrimmage, with 35 plus plays for a plus percentage of 55.6 (actual grade was higher as it took into account neutral results).  He had four knockdown blocks and two touchdown blocks, while not allowing a quarterback sack or pressure and was not called for any penalties.

2012 (Fr.-RS): He saw action in eight games, including a start against Fresno State.  He was in for a total of 74 snaps, grading out to 67.6 percent for the season; his best game grade came against Arizona State (75.0).  He played the most in his start, lining up for 32 plays against the Bulldogs.  He had one will-breaker block and allowed one quarterback sack with no pressures allowed while also not being flagged for a penalty.

2011 (Fr.) – Redshirted; he practiced the entire fall on the offensive line but was ineligible to play after transferring to Colorado from College of the Canyons via Venture Community College.  He signed his letter-of-intent in the summer and counted as a member of the 2011 recruiting class; he was the rare exception of his NCAA clock not starting because he attended junior college on a part-time basis, thus he had to sit out a year in residence but still would have four years of eligibility remaining.

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KIAWI CRABB – Offensive Lineman

Recruiting: Crabb was rated as a three-star prospect out of the Class of 2010 by Rivals. Crabb, who played in Honolulu, was considered to be the 10th-best prospect out of Hawai’i that year, and the 42nd-best offensive guard in the nation. Crabb had other offers from Arizona, Washington, and Hawai’i.

Graduation Status: Crabb is graduating this December with a degree in Communications

Career at Colorado:

2014 (Sr.) – Crabb has started ten of 11 games this fall, missing the UCLA game due to injury. Crabb has played in 35 games in his CU career, starting 22. He has been on the field for 790 plays this fall, third-most on the team, with his best grade of the season, 77.3%, coming in the Oregon State game.

2013 (Jr.) – He started all 12 games at left offensive guard, emerging as a consistent performer in the trenches after missing a year with back problems but was finally 100 percent healthy.  He was in for 779 snaps from scrimmage, with 487 plus plays for a plus percentage of 62.5 (game grades were higher, as those took neutral results into account); he played every down in five games and over 90 percent of them in five others.  He had 30 knockdown blocks and two touchdown blocks, while allowing just two quarterback sacks; he was not called for a penalty all season.  He also played an additional eight snaps on the FG/PAT unit on special teams.

2012 (Soph.) – He did not see any action as a nagging back injury bothered him throughout much of the year; he first strained it in winter conditioning drills on February 27.

2011 (Fr.-RS) – He saw action in all 13 games (no starts), playing the last eight games on offense in varying amounts from one to 24 snaps (the latter against Oregon).  He played a total of 77 snaps on the season, and graded out to 67.5 percent, with one great effort block while being called for two penalties.  He played an additional 47 snaps (out of 48) as a member of the Field Goal/PAT unit on special teams.

2010 (Fr.) – Redshirted; practiced on the offensive line (interior, guard and center) and was on the scout team.

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MALCOLM CREER – Running back

Recruiting: Creer was rated as a three-star prospect out of the Class of 2011 by Rivals. Creer, who played at Pacific Palisades in California, had an offer from Washington from the Pac-12, as well as offers from schools like Eastern Washington, Idaho State, and South Dakota.

Graduation Status: Creer is on track to graduate next May with a degree in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences

Career at Colorado:

2014 (Sr.) – Creer has dressed for every game this season, and has seen action in six games. He has had four carries this fall, going for eight yards. Creer has also participated on special teams, contributing six knockdown or springing blocks.

2013 (Jr.) – He saw action in six games (no starts, the final six of the season); he saw the bulk of his action on special teams, posting three knockdown blocks on return unit duty.  He did not record an offensive statistic on the year.  Though ending the spring listed fifth at tailback, he did see plenty of reps once fully back from a nasty knee injury he suffered as a true freshman.

2012 (Soph.) – He played in six games (no starts), seeing limited action as he was still recovering from major knee surgery.  He had seven rushing attempts on the season for 22 yards, the bulk of his action coming in the opener against Colorado State (four carries for 17 yards, with his season-long run of 10 yards).  He also caught a pass for a 1-yard loss.  He missed all of spring practice while undergoing rehabilitation following the surgery; the knee was still a bit sore at the start of August camp so his return to practice was delayed.

2011 (Fr.) – Plans likely called for him to redshirt, but injuries changed things as he saw his first action in the eighth game of the season against Oregon.  But a week later, he suffered torn ligaments at Arizona State and underwent November surgery.  In limited action, he showed explosiveness as a kickoff return man (22.0 average on five runbacks) and he had 11 carries for 37 yards against the Sun Devils before leaving the game with the knee injury.  He had 43 yards on 15 carries in the two games he saw action, along with two receptions (for a net zero yards).

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BRADY DAIGH – Linebacker

Recruiting: Daigh was rated as a three-star prospect out of the Class of 2011 by Rivals. Daigh, who played at Mullen high in Denver, was rated as the No. 10 player out of the state of Colorado that year, and the 35th-best inside linebacker in the nation. Daigh had offers from Colorado State, Wyoming, and North Dakota.

Graduation Status: Daigh is on track to graduate next May with a degree in English

Career at Colorado:

2014 (Sr.) – Daigh has played in every game this fall, and had two starts (against Washington and Arizona) when Addison Gillam was out with an injury. Daigh is eighth on the team in tackles, with 36, has one sack and five tackles for loss. Daigh is also sixth on the team in special teams points, with a team-leading 12 knockdown or springing blocks.

2013 (Jr.) – He played in 11 games (one start, versus Southern California) and in eight on defense, missing the finale at Utah with a sprained ankle he suffered against the Trojans.  He saw action both inside and outside; in fact his start against USC was at outside ‘backer; he was in for 113 plays from scrimmage, recording 16 tackles (13 solo) for the season.  He had two tackles for zero, a third down stop and a forced fumble, the latter at Arizona State when he saw his most scrimmage action of the year (32 plays); he logged a career-high 10 tackles (eight solo) against the Sun Devils. The coaches named him the co-recipient of the Bill McCartney Award, given for special teams achievement, as he tied for second with 18 special team points on the strength of four tackles (two inside-the-20), 10 knockdown blocks on returns, a caused penalty and a first downfield credit that altered a return.  He had missed the last portion of spring drills with a slight knee sprain, but the coaches still presented him with the Dick Anderson Award for outstanding toughness.

2012 (Soph.) – He played in 10 games, including one start (Stanford); he missed the USC and Oregon games after suffering a cervical spine strain against Arizona State.  He was in for 250 snaps from scrimmage, recording 40 tackles, which included 31 solo, five for losses including a quarterback sack, three stops for zero gains and two third down stops.  He also had a forced fumble (against Colorado State) and a pass broken up.  He had a season-high nine tackles (seven solo) against Stanford, when he played 67 snaps and registered his sack and pass deflection.  He also had six tackles against Arizona State and five each against Fresno State and Washington.  He won the Bill McCartney Award for special teams achievement; he finished second on the team in special team points with 21, as he was in on six tackles (one inside-the-20), recorded 12 knockdown block, caused one penalty and recovered a blocked kick.

2011 (Fr.) – He saw action as a true freshman, playing in 12 games, nine on defense (no starts; he missed the Colorado State game with a hip contusion).  He saw just 82 snaps from scrimmage, but recorded 18 tackles, or one for every 4.6 plays which led the team; 13 of the stops were solo.  He had a season-high six tackles (four solo) at Washington, with five the very next week against Oregon (four solo).  He also racked up six special team points on the strength of five tackles (one solo, with one of the assists coming inside-the-20).

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THOR EATON – Linebacker

Recruiting: Eaton was not a recruited player, joining the Buffs as a walk-on in 2012. Though Eaton has a year of eligibility remaining, he has opted to forego another year, and play his final season in 2014.

Graduation Status: Eaton is on schedule to graduate in May with a degree in Political Science

Career at Colorado:

2013 (Jr.) – He has not seen any action. Eaton did dress for the CSU, Arizona State, Oregon State and UCLA.

2013 (Soph.) – He did not see any action.  He moved from defensive end to inside linebacker for spring practice.

2012 (Fr.-RS) – He did not see any action, but did dress for three games.  He joined the team as a walk-on for spring practices.  He practiced at defensive end in the spring, marking the first time he played defense in his football career (he was only on offense in high school).

2011 (Fr.) – He attended Colorado as a student, but was not a member of the football team; however, his NCAA “clock” started once he enrolled and started taking classes.

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D.D. GOODSON – Wide Receiver

Recruiting: Goodson was an unrated prospect of the Class of 2011 by Rivals. Goodson, from Rosenberg, Texas, did not join the team until June, 2011. Goodson was prepared to join the Texas San-Antonio program as a preferred walk-on before getting an offer from Colorado.

Graduation Status: Goodson is on pace to graduate next May with a degree in Sociology

Career at Colorado:

2014 (Sr.) – Goodson has played in every game except for the Arizona game, when he was out with an injury. Goodson has started eight games this fall, and 13 games in his career. Goodson is third on the team with 37 receptions for 374 yards and two touchdowns. Goodson is 38th on the all-time list with 59 receptions, and his 680 receiving yards are 44th on the all-time list.

2013 (Jr.) – He played in all 12 games (three starts), as he finished third on the team in receiving; he had 22 catches for 306 yards and two touchdowns, averaging 13.9 yards per catch.  He had 12 grabs of 10 yards or longer and three of 20 or more, including his season long of 75 yards for a TD that he hauled in from Paul Richardson on a little trickery against Oregon.  He also rushed four times for 42 yards.  He caught a career/season-high five passes in the opener against Colorado State, which were good for 44 yards, including an 18-yard TD.  He caught at least one pass in 11 games and two or more in seven contests.  He also caught 2-point conversion passes against both Colorado State and USC, becoming the sixth Buff to score two in the same season.  He also had six special team points on the strength of two tackles, both inside-the-20, and two first downfield credits that altered returns.  He lined up at wide receiver for spring practices, and despite it being the first time he had played receiver since high school, he established himself as a regular in the rotation.  He led the team in receptions in the four main spring scrimmages with 13, which he caught for 169 yards and three touchdowns.  He moved to receiver from tailback for the spring, and the switch was so successful that he was named the recipient of the Fred Casotti Award as the most improved offensive back.

2012 (Soph.) – He saw action in eight games (no starts), though on a limited basis as a reserve tailback.  He gained 18 yards on five attempts on the season: he had one carry for 11 yards against Arizona State and two attempts for six yards at Oregon that accounted for the bulk of his stats.  He had one punt return attempt, which he fumbled against CSU late in the first half.  He moved back over to offense from the secondary for spring drills, and looked very good at times, rushing 13 times for 55 yards in the major scrimmages (long of 24).

2011 (Fr.) – He originally was intended to redshirt, but injuries forced him into action.  He started his first game against Oregon in week eight, and would play in four games overall including two starts as the nickel back (the other was against USC).  He was in for 98 snaps from scrimmage on the season, logging eight tackles (six solo); he had four tackles (three unassisted) against Oregon in 44 snaps on the field, and also returned kickoffs that game, averaging 19.4 yards for five runbacks.  He had two solo stops in 25 plays versus the Trojans in his other start.  He was the final high school recruit in Jon Embree’s first class, signing with the Buffaloes on June 8.  Designated as an “athlete” instead of at a specific position when he reported, the 4.4-speedster started out on offense but was shuttled over to defense due to all the injuries in the secondary.

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WOODSON GREER III – Linebacker

Recruiting: Greer was rated as a three-star prospect out of the Class of 2011 by Rivals. Greer, from Gardena, California, was rated as the No. 99 player out of the state of California that year. Greer had offers from Michigan, Arizona State, and San Jose State.

Graduation Status: Greer is the only Buff not in line to graduate by May, 2015. He is, however, on pace to graduate in August, 2015, with a degree in sociology.

Career at Colorado:

2014 (Sr.) – Greer has played in every game this fall, with one start, against UMass. Greer has played mostly on special teams, though he has been on the field on defense for 131 plays over six games, registering ten tackles.

2013 (Jr.) – He saw action in eight games (four starts), as his position was the one that came out of the lineup when the Buffs were in the nickel defense.  He missed the last four games of the year after suffering a nasty stinger in practice on Nov. 5, one that even prevented him from practicing other than on an extremely limited basis.  In playing the most to date in his career, he was in for 268 snaps from scrimmage and recorded 34 tackles, 25 of which were solo including two for losses.  He also had four tackles for zero gains, two quarterback hurries, a third down stop and a fumble recovery, the latter coming against Arizona when he was also in on seven tackles (five solo) and played a career-best 62 snaps.  He posted a career-high eight tackles (six unassisted) against Charleston Southern.  He had a good spring and was the recipient of the Greg Biekert Award as selected by the coaching staff as the most improved linebacker.

2012 (Soph.) – He saw action in nine games, including six on defense at outside linebacker (no starts), recording 12 tackles, seven of the solo variety, in 69 snaps from scrimmage.  He saw his most playing time against Arizona State, when he was in for 25 plays and posted a season-high seven tackles (five solo), with his first career quarterback sack.  He was third on the team in special team points with 19, on the strength of two solo tackles (one inside-the-20), seven knockdown blocks, three caused penalties, three forced fair catches, two first downfield credits that altered the return path, and a fumble recovery.  He had entered the fall listed second at ‘sam’ (outside) linebacker and had six solo tackles, including a sack, in the main spring scrimmages.

2011 (Fr.) – He saw action in five games, including three on defense at outside linebacker (no starts), playing a total of 40 snaps from scrimmage.  He had three tackles on the year, two solo, with a third down stop and a tackle for zero.  He finished eighth on the team in special team points with 11, on the strength of eight knockdown blocks, a downed punt, one tackle and one assist.

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GREG HENDERSON – Defensive Back

Recruiting: Henderson was rated as a two-star prospect out of the Class of 2011 by Rivals. Henderson, from Norco, California, had offers from Air Force and New Mexico, but no Pac-12 or other Power-Five conference schools.

Graduation Status: Henderson is on pace to graduate next spring with a degree in Business (Finance)

Career at Colorado:  

2014 (Sr.) – Henderson has started every game this fall, and has 44 starts in his career, the most ever by a CU defensive back (Victor Scott had 43, 1980-83).  He has been on the field for more snaps than any other player on the team (766), with 48 tackles and a team-leading 14 passes broken up. Henderson was selected preseason fourth-team All-Pac-12 by Athlon Sports and Phil Steele’s College Football, the latter ranking him as the nation’s No. 29 cornerback.  He again won the Iron Buffalo Award for the defensive backs for his spring work in the weight room.

2013 (Jr.) – He started all 12 games at right cornerback in earning first-team All-Colorado honors from the state’s chapter of the National Football Foundation.  In playing the most snaps by a Buff on defense (897), he finished third on the team in tackles with 68 (46 solo, with two for losses and another pair for zero gain), and was second with 14 third down stops.  He led the team in interceptions with four, returning those for 82 yards, which included a 46-yard return for a touchdown against Central Arkansas; it was the most picks by a CU player since Lorenzo Sims interception five back in 2004.  He had a fumble recovery, which he turned into a big 53-yard return for a score against Colorado State that expanded CU’s lead to 33-24 early in the fourth quarter.  He also led the team in passes broken up with 10, and along the way picked up six touchdown saves.  He had four or more tackles in 11 games, including nine twice, against Oregon State and at Washington (when he had a season high eight solo).  He had two interceptions against Oregon, with his other coming against Oregon State.  He added two assisted tackles and a downed punt inside-the-5 on special teams duty.  He won the Iron Buffalo Award for the defensive backs for spring conditioning in the weight room, and had a fine spring overall (he had two interceptions in the four main scrimmages).

2012 (Soph.) – He played in 10 games (eight starts) a year ago, missing time in the front third of the season with a knee sprain he suffered in the season opener against Colorado State; he still managed to evolve into a solid cornerback after being thrown into the fire as a true freshman in 2011.  For the year, he was in for exactly 600 plays from scrimmage, racking up 47 tackles (31 solo, including three for losses and one tackle for zero).  He also had two third down stops, three pass deflections and a forced fumble (the latter against Stanford).  He had a season-high six tackles twice, in the last two games of the season (versus Washington, with five solo, and Utah, four being unassisted).

2011 (Fr.) – He played in all 13 games, starting 12 (all but the California game), all at right cornerback.  In earning CU’s Lee Willard Award as the team’s most outstanding freshman, the league coaches voted him as an honorable mention All-Pac 12 team member, collegefootballnews.com tabbed him as a second-team freshman All-American, he was a second-team All-Colorado performer as selected by the state’s chapter of the National Football Foundation and rivals.com placed him on its Freshman All-Pac 12 team.  He set a school record for the most defensive plays by a freshman with 823, with his 76 against Washington State also a single-game freshman best.  He was in on 58 tackles, 44 solo, with three for losses, three tackles for zero (so six at or behind the line of scrimmage), six third down stops, a forced fumble and one recovered.  He had one interception, which came against Arizona’s heralded quarterback Nick Foles.  He led the team with nine pass deflections, the first freshman in school history to ever do so since numbers started being tracked in 1964.  He had a season/career-high 10 tackles at Stanford (six solo), seven against UCLA and four on eight other occasions.  He added two solo tackles on special teams coverage duty.

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TONY JONES – Running Back

Recruiting:  Jones was rated as a three-star prospect out of the Class of 2010 by Rivals. Jones, from Ramsey, New Jersey, was considered to be the 5th-best player out of the state of New Jersey that year, and the 14th-best all-purpose back in the country.

Graduation Status: Jones will be graduating this December with a degree in Ethnic Studies

Career at Colorado:

2014 (Sr.) – Jones has played in all 11 games to date, earning starts in six of those games. Overall, Jones has played in 47 games in his CU career, including nine starts. The senior running back is fourth on the team in rushing in 2014, with 361 yards, but he is only 37 yards behind the top running back on the team, Michael Adkins, who has 398 with one game to play. Jones is tied for the team lead in rushing touchdowns, with three, and is also sixth on the team in receiving, with 22 catches for 145 yards. Jones is 38th on the all-time rushing list (1,227), 19th in receptions (88), and 60th in receiving yards (552).

Jones is the member of two distinct clubs in CU history. He is one of only nine players to ever rush for over 1,000 yards and 500 receiving yards, and one of only 13 players to have at least 500 yards in each category.

2013 (Jr.)—He played in all 12 games (no starts), and finished third on the team in rushing with 249 yards on 73 attempts (scoring one touchdown).  He also caught 13 passes for 93 yards and a TD, averaging 7.2 yards per reception, and overall, earned 13 first downs.  His rushing single-game high came in the second game of the season against Central Arkansas (13-58), with his receiving best coming at UCLA (3-42).  His rushing touchdown came on a 1-yard run at UCLA, with his TD reception covering 10 yards against California.  He accrued six special team points, logging one in six separate categories: an assisted tackle, a knockdown block, a downed punt, a recovered kick, a first downfield credit that altered the path of the return man and a forced fair catch.

2012 (Soph.)—He played in 11 games (two starts, missing the Fresno State game due to a sore ankle), finishing second on the team in rushing with 320 yards; he averaged a team-best 5.1 yards per rush, buoyed by an 84-yard touchdown run at Washington State.  That play was key in CU’s comeback from 17 points down in a 35-34 win, and tied for the eighth-longest rushing play in school history.  He was third on the team in receptions (26) and scoring (18 points), and earned 13 first downs (seven rushing, six receiving).  He had a career-high 105 yards on four carries at Washington State, and gained between 31 and 43 yards on five occasions; his other touchdowns came against Arizona State and Utah.  He caught five passes (for 19 yards) versus UCLA and had four catches for a season-best 57 yards at USC.  He was dedicated in his summer workouts, gaining 12-15 pounds of muscle in his upper body and entered the season at a playing weight of 190, up from 175 as a redshirt frosh.  He had 22 touches for 316 yards in the spring (14.4 per, 15-216 rushing, 7-100 receiving) with three touchdowns.

2011 (Fr.-RS)—He played in all 13 games, including two starts (Oregon, Arizona State), finishing second on the team in rushing with 297 yards on 78 carries (3.8 per) and two touchdowns.  He was also a favorite target out of the backfield, hauling in 27 receptions for 198 yards and two scores; those were the fourth most catches on the team.  He earned 22 first downs (14 rushing), picking up four of those in five 3rd-and-1 on third downs.  He tried his hand at returning kickoffs, with six for 105 yards, or 17.5 per.  He had the bulk of his rushing yards subbing for an injured Rodney Stewart, seeing his first extensive action at Washington after Stewart went down: he had 14 carries for 49 yards which included both his scoring runs (1- and 2-yards) and caught seven passes for 49 yards.  In his first start, he had 71 yards on 19 attempts against Oregon, and when Stewart was injured again in the season finale at Utah, he had 72 yards on 12 carries.  He also caught seven passes for 61 yards at Arizona State and had his receiving TD’s at Stanford and versus Arizona (both five yards in length).  He had an outstanding spring, as in the three main scrimmages, he rushed 36 times for 189 yards (5.3 avg.) and two touchdowns.

2010 (Fr.)—Redshirted; practiced all fall in the offensive backfield and played a key role on the scout team.

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TYLER McCULLOCH – Wide Receiver

Recruiting:  McCulloch was rated as a two-star prospect from the Class of 2011 by Rivals. McCulloch, from Albuquerque, did not have any reported other scholarship offers, and did not sign on Signing Day, 2011, joining the Buffs two weeks after Signing Day.

Graduation Status: McCulloch will graduate with a Communications degree next May

Career at Colorado:

2014 (Sr.) – The Buffs’ possession receiver, McCulloch is third on the team with 26 catches for 318 yards and two touchdowns. McCulloch’s best game came against Oregon State, with four catches for 76 yards and both of his 2014 touchdowns.

2013 (Jr.) – He played in all 12 games (no starts), despite his being hampered much of the season with an injured foot (deemed a stress reaction).  He caught 14 passes for 138 yards and a touchdown, all but one in the first half of the season.  His top game came against Central Arkansas, when he had five grabs for 50 yards; his scored his touchdown on a 24-yard pass from Connor Wood at Oregon State (he caught two balls for 29 yards in that contest).  He also made three receptions for 41 yards at Arizona State.

2012 (Soph.) – He played in all 12 games, including 10 starts, finishing second on the team in both receptions (34) and yards (436), as well as owning the second best yards per catch (12.8) for those with 10 or more receptions.  He was also second in catches for 20 or more yards (6) and those that went 10-plus (17).  He scored two touchdowns, which came against CSU and Fresno State, and had at least one catch in 11 games with a high of seven (for 69 yards) versus UCLA.  His yardage best came in the season finale against Utah, when he had six receptions for 88 yards.  He earned 16 first downs (including six of eight catches on third downs), and he caught 15 balls on first down throws (for a team best 13.5 yards per).  He had one special teams point, coming on a knockdown block on return unit duty.  He was one of only three receivers on the roster who entered the year that had caught a pass in college.

2011 (Fr.) – He played in all 13 games, including two starts (California, Colorado State), becoming just the seventh true freshman to start at least one game at wide receiver since 1973 (but the fifth since 2007).    He caught 10 passes for 96 yards and a touchdown, with six of the receptions earning first downs.  He caught two passes in three games and one in four others; he had two for 25 yards in his first career game, the season opener at Hawai’i.  He also caught a pair against Cal and Stanford, and his touchdown came on a 14-yard throw from Tyler Hansen at Ohio State.  He also saw action on special teams, racking up five special team points on the strength of four knockdown blocks and a fumble recovery (the latter against Oregon).

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DANIEL MUNYER – Offensive Lineman

Recruiting: Munyer was rated as a three-star prospect from the Class of 2010 by Rivals. Munyer, from Sherman Oaks, California, had offers from most of the Mountain West Conference, including Colorado State, Nevada, New Mexico, San Diego State and UNLV.

Graduation Status: Munyer is graduating this December with degrees in Communication and Digital Media

Career at Colorado:

2014 (Sr.) – CU’s starting right offensive guard.  He was elected by his teammates as one of six team captains for the 2014 season.  He was selected preseason second-team All-Pac-12 by Athlon Sports and was a third-team choice by Phil Steele’s College Football.  The coaches selected him as the recipient of the Eddie Crowder Award for the spring, presented to a player who provided outstanding leadership. Munyer has started every game this season at right guard, and has the most consecutive starts of anyone on the team, with 35.

2013 (Jr.) – He started all 12 games at right offensive guard, playing 742 snaps from scrimmage (fifth-most among the linemen).  He had 510 plus plays, grading to a 68.7 plus percentage; his actual game and season grades were higher as they took neutral results into the equation.  He tied for the team lead in direct touchdown blocks with six, and was second in knockdown blocks with 41 (combined pancakes, blown the opponent off the line and/or driving finishes).  He was called for juts two penalties, allowed two-and-a-half sacks and allowed eight pressures.  The coaches presented him with CU’s Tyronee “Tiger” Bussey Award, presented to the player who displays inspiration in the face of physical adversity.  He suffered a fractured fibula in spring drills (March 21, in a fumble recovery drill), and missed the last eight practices.  He was limited in fall camp, and two-thirds of the way in he was still not all the way back though was increasing his participation in contact drills.  Athlon Sports selected him as a third-team guard on its All-Pac 12 preseason team.

2012 (Soph.) – He earned honorable mention All-Pac 12 honors from the league coaches, and was a mid-season All-Pac 12 choice by Phil Steele’s College Football.  He started all 12 games, six at right guard and six at center, the latter due to injuries, and played the most snaps of all the offensive linemen with 785.  He had 653 plus-plays, thus graded out to 83.2 percent for the season, and graded to 80 percent or higher in nine of 12 games, with a high of 88.6 percent against Stanford.  He led the team in will-breaker blocks (essentially pancakes-plus) with 49, and tied for the lead in touchdown blocks with seven.  He was not called for a penalty and allowed only two-and-a-half quarterback sacks and three pressures.  He played another 10 snaps on the field goal/PAT unit on special teams.

2011 (Fr.-RS) – He saw action in seven games (three starts); he emerged as the starting center at the end of spring drills and held it through competition in August camp.  He started the first three games before going down with a severe ankle sprain against Colorado State that forced him to miss the next four games.  On the year, he was in for 205 snaps from scrimmage, grading out to 76.1 percent, with his best game grade a solid 81.0 percent against California.  He had five great effort blocks, allowed one quarterback pressure, three sacks and was called for two penalties.  He also had three plays on the Field Goal/PAT unit on special teams.  The coaches selected him as the Dan Stavely Award winner following spring practice, the honor going to the top redshirt freshman-to-be.

2010 (Fr.) – Redshirted; he practiced all along the offensive line as a member of the scout team.  He earned the Offensive Scout Team Award for the Colorado State game.

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DARRAGH O’NEILL – Punter

Recruiting: I had forgotten this, but Darragh O’Neill was not recruited. O’Neill was a student at CU who walked onto the team, becoming just the seventh walk-on to play as a true freshman since 1986.

Graduation Status: O’Neill will graduate with a business degree (accounting) next May.

Career at Colorado:

2014 (Sr.) – O’Neill is enjoying his finest year to date (he was on the official watch list for the Ray Guy Award as the nation’s top punter, but did not advance as a semifinalist). Among the national leaders all season, O’Neill is currently averaging career bests of 44.0 yards per punt, with a net average of 39.0. He is third in the conference and 20th in the nation in gross average, and third and 33rd in the net number. He has almost half his kicks inside-the-20 (22 of 52), with 10 of those inside-the-15, six inside-the-10 and three inside-the-five, with just 17 of his kicks returned.

Other than the combo of Sefo Liufau and Nelson Spruce, no player has re-written as many records this fall as Darragh O’Neill. He has the career record for punts, 276 (old record, 216), punting yards, 11,818 (9,145), and came into the season already owning the records for punts inside the 20-yard line (now up to 93), and inside the 10 (31).

2013 (Jr.) – Once again, he was CU’s punter for the third straight season, averaging 40.5 yards for 66 punts; his average dipped a bit because the average yardline of his kicks was the CU37 (compared to the 32 in 2012).  Sixteen of those kicks originated in opponent territory (35.1 average), had he placed 13 of those inside-the-20.  He owned the same average, 42.2, for punts on CU’s side of the 50 as well as for 10 that were inside the Buff 25.  Only 20 of his kicks were returned, with another 19 fair caught (four went for touchbacks).  He placed 22 kicks inside-the-20, 18 of which were inside-the-15; his 10 inside-the-10 set a school record (three were placed inside-the-5).  He had a punt blocked against USC, which ended a streak of 131 without one that dated back to 2011; it was the second-longest streak in school history (to 153 by Barry Helton, 1984-87).  He did make some school history, however, when he converted a 2-point conversion on a run against Charleston Southern, the first CU punter to ever score a 2-point PAT (he also attempted a failed pass for one at Arizona State).   For the second straight year, he was one of 25 players on the official preseason watch list for the Ray Guy Award, which is presented to the nation’s top punter (and was one of 36 players on the preseason watch list for the top punter as determined by the College Football Performance Awards).  He was the unanimous preseason choice as the first-team Pac-12 punter, selected by Athlon Sports, Lindy’s Pac-12 Football, Phil Steele’s College Football, The Sporting News and USA Today.

2012 (Soph.) – He earned honorable mention All-American honors from Sports Illustrated, and honorable mention All-Pac 12 accolades from the league coaches (he was a honorable mention Sophomore All-American by collegefootballnews.com).  He averaged 43.5 yards for 76 punts in 2012, placing a school record 25 inside-the-20 (14 inside-the-15, seven inside-the-10 and two inside-the-5), forcing 23 fair catches as 60.5 percent of his kicks were not returned; his average jumped to 44.5 when accounting for eight punts coming inside opponent territory (he put six of those inside-the-20), and he had 16 kicks of 50 yards or longer.   All but two of his punts were with his right leg, he did two with his left, averaging 47.0 yards on those with one inside-the-20 (both were rugby style).  He tied the school record for the most punts in a single season, and set CU marks for season punting yards (3,307) and punts inside-the-20 with the 25.  He was model of consistency, averaging at least 42.5 yards per punt in nine of 12 games, and over 40 in 11 games.  He was one of 25 players on the official preseason watch list for the Ray Guy Award (and was one of 44 on a similar list for the College Football Performance Awards punter of the year).  A former walk-on, he was placed on scholarship permanently beginning in the 2012 spring semester.

2011 (Fr.-RS)He became just the fifth player in CU history to serve as the team’s regular punter as a freshman, joining Stan Koleski (’73), Andy Mitchell (’94), Matt DiLallo (’06) and teammate Zach Grossnickle (’10); his 74 punts were the most ever by a Buff frosh, breaking Grossnickle’s record of 60.  He played in all 13 games, and by the end of the season, he had become just the seventh walk-on to play as a true freshman since 1986, and would be rewarded by earning a scholarship.  He earned second-team Freshman All-American honors from both collegefootballnews.com and Phil Steele’s College Football and was a rivals.com first-team Freshman All-Pac 12 performer.  Phil Steele’s also tabbed him mid-season third-team All-Pac 12.  He was a three-time honorable mention Intersport Performer of the Week selection fort his efforts against Colorado State (43.7 average on seven punts), Oregon (43.2, 12) and UCLA (44.0, 6).  He averaged 42.6 yards per punt, with a 38.8 net figure; 21 of his 74 kicks placed inside-the-20 (eight inside-the-10, three inside-the-5) and 17 traveling 50 yards or longer with 57 his longest.  His 21-to-2 ratio of inside-the-20 punts to touchbacks was fourth best in the nation and only 29 were returned, the longest for 31 yards; 20 were fair caught.  He averaged 43.5 yards for 19 punts inside the CU 25, and 43.4 on 65 boots from the 50 or further out.  His 42.6 average was the second-best by a freshman in the nation, trailing only LSU’s Brad Wing (44.4 on 59 punts); it was the second highest ever by a CU frosh, behind a 43.7 figure in 2006 by DiLallo.  The 74 punts were the second most for a single-season in school history, well over the previous most by a freshman, 47, also by DiLallo; his net average of 38.8 set a CU freshman record, besting DiLallo’s 38.5 mark.  Against Oregon, he placed six punts inside-the-20, setting a CU single-game record as it topped the five that Mitch Berger had against Texas in 1993; four of those were inside-the-10, also a school best as several had done it three times.  He joined the team as a walk-on in spring practices, trying out as a punter; it was the first time he had ever played organized football. 

2010 (Fr.) – He attended Colorado as a student, but was not a member of the football team; however, his NCAA “clock” started once he enrolled and started taking classes.

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WILL OLIVER – Kicker

Recruiting: Oliver was rated as a two-star prospect from the Class of 2011 by Rivals. Oliver, from North Hollywood, California, had offers from Maryland and Fresno State, but committed to Colorado the week before Signing Day, 2011.

Graduation Status: Will be graduating next May with a business degree (finance)

Career at Colorado:

2014 (Sr.) – Oliver has set, and continues to set, numerous records at the University of Colorado. Oliver has made 99 consecutive extra points, extending his own record each week. Oliver is second on the all-time list in both scoring and kick scoring (269 points), second only to Mason Crosby on both lists. Oliver is tied for second in field goals made (48) and attempted (67), and first in career extra points made (125) and attempted (127). Oliver is 14-of-19 on field goal attempts this season, with a long of 49 yards.

2013 (Jr.) – He earned honorable mention All-Pac-12 honors as voted on by the league coaches, and was also one of 20 semifinalists for the Lou Groza Award, which is presented to the nation’s top placekicker. The coaches named him the co-recipient of the Bill McCartney Award, given for special teams achievement.  He led the team in scoring with 81 points, connecting on all 30 extra-point kicks (extending his streak to 60 in a row) and making good on 17-of-24 field goals (the same exact figures he had compiled over his first two seasons).  He opened the year strong by scoring 15 points in CU’s 41-27 win over Colorado State: he made all seven kicks he attempted in the game, three PATs and four field goals, which came from 22, 41, 44 and 52 yards, and he had two touchbacks kicking off; the Groza committee made him one of its “three stars of the week.”  He made three field goals in two other games, Oregon (3-of-3, from 33, 22 and 31 yards) and at UCLA (3-of-5, from 23, 47 and 37 yards).  He drilled a career-long 53 yard field goal against Arizona, and also kicked a 48-yarder (both kicks were five minutes apart in the second quarter).  The average distance of his makes was 33.6 yards (and misses from 46.3 yards), as he was 13-of-15 inside of 45 yards.  He assumed the regular role of kicking off for the first time in his career with 56 total, 29 of which were returned; 26 went for touchbacks (16 through the end zone) with the other being fair caught. Of those kicks that were returned, nine did not make it back past the 25 and six not beyond the 20.  He connected on 24-of-25 kicks in the four spring scrimmages.

2012 (Soph.) – He saw action in 11 games, and led the team in scoring with 46 points; he didn’t have an opportunity to overly show his talents, attempting only eight field goals all year (made six). His long make was just 37 yards as he had one attempt all year over that distance (a 43-yard try that was blocked against Utah), and he converted all 28 extra-point kicks.  He had his first real pressure PAT kick of his career (he had some critical field goal tries as a frosh) when he made the game-winner in CU’s 35-34 win at Washington State.  He also made a 30-yared field goal early in the fourth quarter that gave CU a 17-16 lead in the season opener against Colorado State, and drilled a 36-yarder as time expired to pull CU within 20-17 of Arizona State at halftime.  He kicked off seven times, with the opponent starting on average at its own 23.  He missed the last portion of spring practice due to a chronic shoulder issue, but was deadly before he was sidelined.  He made good of 9-of-10 kicks in three main spring scrimmages (he sat out the spring game), with a long of 58 and the average distance of his makes covering 48.6 yards – his miss was from 60 and it was wide left, not short.

2011 (Fr.) – He saw action in 12 games, setting a school record for the most points scored (62) by a freshman in CU history, besting the old mark by 10 points (Mason Crosby scored 52 in 2003).  He also set frosh school marks for field goals made (11) and attempted (16) while making good on 29-of-31 PAT kicks.  In just his second game, Oliver was named one of the three “Stars of the Week” by the Lou Groza Award, as he kicked four field goals and three extra points in CU’s 36-33 overtime loss to California.  He nailed a 32-yarder to send the game into overtime in the final minute, made a 22-yarder to account for CU’s OT scoring, and in the first half, made good on a 52-yard kick that was the longest by a freshman in CU history and the longest in the nation by a true freshman in 2011 (the second-longest by any freshman and just one of three of 50 yards or longer by all frosh; it tied for the 22nd longest in the nation and the third longest in the Pac-12 in 2011).  He opened 6-of-6 in field goal attempts, the first player at Colorado to make his first six field goals in a career in a single season (old mark was five by Crosby in 2003).  He missed out tying the record for the most consecutive made field goals to start a Buff career (7, by Jeremy Flores, over two seasons, 2000-01); his seventh try was blocked by Washington State as the right side of the FG/PAT unit was overrun on the attempt.  He bounced back to make two 48-yard efforts, however, and the average distance of his 11 makes were 37.2 yards.  He also made his first 22 career PAT tries before missing wide left against Arizona, though that miss was aided by winds gusting to 60 miles per hour.  While just 6-of-10 on field goals inside 40 yards as the four misses were all blocked, he was a very impressive 5-of-6 outside of 40 yards.  He became just the seventh true freshman to attempt a placekick in Colorado history, joining Tim Mangnall (1976), Tom Field (1979), Ken Culbertson (1986), Eric Hannah (1987), Mason Crosby (2003) and Justin Castor (2010); he joined Field and Crosby as the only ones to play in the season opener.

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JUDA PARKER – Defensive Lineman

Recruiting: Parker was rated as a three-star prospect from the Class of 2011 by Rivals. Parker, from Honolulu, was considered to be the best player overall out of the state of Hawai’i that season, and the 28th-best weakside defensive end in the nation. Parker had numerous other offers, including offers from Baylor and Oregon State, as well as Hawai’i, Wyoming, and New Mexico State.

Graduation status: Will be graduating this December, with a degree in Communications

Career at Colorado:

2014 (Sr.) – Parker was honored by his teammates after spring practices by being named as one of CU’s six captains for the 2014 season.  Parker has started every game this year, giving him 21 career starts in 44 games played. This fall, Parker has 30 tackles (15 solo), with 1.5 sacks, three third-down stops and three quarterback pressures.

2013 (Jr.) – He saw action in all 12 games, including making starts in nine; he was in for 461 snaps from scrimmage (over 100 more than he played combined as an underclassman).  He recorded 28 tackles, 18 solo with a quarterback sack and a tackle for zero; he also had two quarterback pressures, a third down stop, fumble recovery and a pass broken up.  He had a career/season-high seven tackles against Oregon (five solo), along with a hurry in playing 71 snaps, the most in a game in his career; he posted four tackles in two other games (Charleston Southern, at UCLA), while his fumble recovery came at Arizona State.  He participated on a limited basis in spring practice, as he completed rehabilitation from off-season shoulder surgery, but was 100 percent come August drills.  He won the Iron Buffalo Award for the defensive linemen for spring conditioning in the weight room.

2012 (Soph.) – He saw action in all 12 games (no starts), playing 241 snaps from scrimmage as he worked his way into the basic rotation at defensive end.  He was in for 19 tackles (14 solo, one for a loss), with one third down stop and three quarterback hurries.  He had a season/career-high four tackles against both Arizona State and Oregon (three solo in each game); he also had three tackles, all unassisted, against Colorado State.  He added two tackles on special teams duty, one of which was a solo stop on a two-point conversion run attempt by Southern California.  Following the season, he had surgery on Nov. 30 to mend some chronic issues he was experiencing with one of his shoulders.  He had a solid spring and recorded seven tackles in the main scrimmages.

2011 (Fr.) – He saw action in nine games, including one start (versus Washington State), just the sixth true freshman to start at least one game at defensive end/outside linebacker since 1973.  He was in for 109 plays from scrimmage, making six tackles (all solo), with two tackles for loss, a third down stop and a tackle for zero gain.  He had two solo tackles at Arizona State, one a third down stop and a tackle for loss, with one tackle in four other games.  He was the recipient of the Buffalo Leadership and Initiative Award for all CU athletic freshmen, as the honor is given for outstanding initiative and demonstration to strong commitment to service to the CU and Boulder communities.

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KYLE SLAVIN – Tight End

Recruiting: Slavin was rated as a three-star prospect from the Class of 2010 by Rivals. Slavin, from Chatfield high in Littleton, was considered to be the 12th-best player out of the state of Colorado that year. Slavin’s only other reported offer was from Syracuse, but Slavin committed to Colorado the June before Signing Day, perhaps cutting down on his offers. Other schools showing interest included Arizona State, Washington, and Wisconsin.

Graduation status: Has already graduated, earning degrees in Communications and Political Science in December, 2013

Career at Colorado:

2014 (Sr.) – Slavin has played in all 11 games, including eight starts. He has ten catches this season, going for 102 yards with a long of 18 yards. For his career, with one game to play, Slavin has been on the field for 42 games, including 21 starts.

2013 (Jr.) – He played in all 12 games, including starting on nine occasions, and also saw significant time on special teams.  Primarily used in blocking situations, he did catch nine passes for 68 yards and a touchdown.  His top game was at UCLA, when he caught three passes for 23 yards, with his other multi-catch game against Colorado State in the opener (two for 12 yards).  His TD reception covered 10 yards from Sefo Liufau in the California game, giving the Buffaloes a 10-0 lead at the time.  On special teams, he recorded 11 knockdown blocks on the kickoff return unit; those are credited with clearing the path for additional yardage on a return.

2012 (Soph.) – He played in all 12 games, including three starts, making 14 receptions for 109 yards (7.8 per) and a touchdown; eight of his grabs earned first downs (both of his third down catches earned firsts).  His first career catch was for a touchdown, covering nine yards against Sacramento State.  He caught three balls for 20 yards in two games, at Washington State and versus Arizona State.  He also saw action on special teams (recording one point, a knockdown block).  He improved during the spring, and caught three passes for 32 yards in main scrimmage action.

2011 (Fr.-RS) – He saw action in seven games on offense and special teams, making one start, versus Washington State when the offense opened in a two-tight end set.  He did not have any receptions, but had one knockdown block on kickoff return unit duty.  He had a solid spring, catching five passes for 68 yards and two touchdowns in the three main spring scrimmages.   Three of those receptions for 50 yards came in the spring game, including touchdowns that covered 22 and seven yards.

2010 (Fr.) – Redshirted; practiced the entire fall at tight end.  He was the Scout Team Special Teams Award winner for the Georgia game.

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TERREL SMITH – Defensive Back

Recruiting: Smith was rated as a two-star prospect from the Class of 2010 by Rivals. Smith, from Wayne, New Jersey, went unsigned on Signing Day, latching onto the Buffs a few weeks later. Smith had interest from schools like Pittsburgh and Maryland, but no offers until the Buffs came along.

Graduation status: December, 2014 – Degree in Communications

Career at Colorado:

2014 (Sr.) – Despite missing all of the 2013 season, and being limited in spring practices, Smith was nonetheless elected as one of CU six captains for the fall. Smith played in the first six games, mostly on special teams, but did not find his way back into the starting lineup until the USC game, the 20th start of his career. Smith then started against UCLA before being injured and missing the Washington game. Smith returned to the starting lineup against Arizona and Oregon, starts No. 22 and 23 of his career. In the five games prior to the Oregon game, Smith had only 17 tackles on the season. Against the Ducks, though, Smith was second on the team with ten tackles (eight solo). Smith is also second on the team in special team points, with 21, including eight tackles and 11 knock down springing blocks.

Smith has 193 career tackles, is tied for sixth on the career list for special team tackles, and eighth on the career list for special team points.

2013 (Sr.-RS) – He decided to use a redshirt year available to him and opted to have a chronic shoulder injury repaired; he underwent surgery on September 5 and started the rehabilitation process soon thereafter.

2012 (Jr.) – He played in all 12 games, including seven starts, and was CU’s second-leading tackler with 70 (48 solo).  He recorded a team-high seven touchdown saves and added three third down stops, three passes broken up, two fumble recoveries and three quarterback pressures.  He had a season-high 12 tackles (seven solo) and a fumble recovery against Arizona State, with 11 (eight solo) at Oregon; he had six games in all with eight or more tackles.  He earned 11 special team points, on the strength of five solo tackles (one of which was inside-the-20), two knockdown blocks, a downed punt, a forced fair catch and a caused penalty.  He had a fine spring, with eight tackles and an interception in the main spring scrimmages.

2011 (Soph.) – He saw action in all 13 games, 11 on defense including six starts.  He was in for exactly 400 snaps from scrimmage, recording 36 tackles (29 solo), with three third down stops, a quarterback chasedown (near sack) and an interception (which he made at Stanford).  He had a season-high eight tackles (seven solo) against Southern California, with six (five solo) at Washington and five (four solo) versus Arizona; one of the stops against the Wildcats was a key fourth down stop when he sniffed out a fake punt attempt on UA’s first drive of the second half.  He led the team in special team tackles with 14 (11 solo, three inside-the-20) and he was second in overall points with 25; he also had three forced fair catches, two first downfield credits that altered returns, a touchdown save, a knockdown block and a caused penalty.  His biggest tackle came on punt coverage, when he tackled Oregon’s Cliff Harris in the end zone for a safety, helping the Buffs avert a shutout as those were CU’s only points in a 45-2 loss.  He was the special teams award winner for his efforts in the Colorado State game.

2010 (Fr.) – He was originally penciled in to redshirt, practicing at safety over the first half of the season, but after the season-ending injury to Anthony Perkins, he was “activated” and started the last six games of the year at strong safety (or in each one he appeared in).  He finished fourth on the team in tackles with 60 (30 solo, two for losses), but his 10.0 average per game was a team-best; the 60 tackles were the third-most in a single-season by a true freshman in school history (behind Jordan Dizon, 85 in 2007, and J.J. Billingsley, 67 in 2002).  In 414 snaps from scrimmage, he also had a quarterback sack, one tackle for zero, three third down stops, a pass broken up and an interception, the latter coming at Kansas.  In his first career game against Texas Tech, he tied the school record for the most tackles in a game by a true freshman with 15 (four solo including his sack); he matched the mark set by J.J. Billingsley against San Diego State in 2002.  He then took over the record for himself in the season finale at Nebraska, recording a career-high 17 tackles (11 solo); that matched the overall freshman mark by Matt Russell, who had 17 at Oklahoma State in 1993.  Those were his two double-figure tackle games, and he also had nine (four solo) at Kansas and eight (five solo) at Oklahoma.  He also had seven special team points on the strength of five tackles (three solo, one-inside-the 20) and a knockdown block.  He was one of seven true freshmen to play for the Buffs in the 2010 season.

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K.T. TU’UMALO – Linebacker

Recruiting: Tu’umalo was rated as a three-star prospect from the Class of 2011 by Rivals. Considered to be the 5th-best player out of the state of Hawai’i that season, Tu’umalo had offers from Arizona and Oregon State from the Pac-12, as well as schools like Boise State, Hawai’i, and San Diego State

Graduation status: December, 2014 – Degree in Communications

Career at Colorado:

2014 (Sr.) – Tu’umalo has seen action in every game this fall, but has not started. He has been only the field on defense in only one game this fall, and that was for only two plays. Tu’umalo has recorded one tackle and one knockdown block on special teams.

2013 (Jr.) – He saw action in 11 games, one on defense, but in all of those on special teams.   In his one game on defense, which came against Southern California, he was in for 14 plays, making four tackles (all solo, one of which was a 1-yard quarterback sack) along with a third down stop.  He earned seven points on special teams duty in CU’s elaborate point scoring system on the strength of three tackles (one solo, one inside-the-20) and three knockdown blocks.  He opened the year practicing at “will” inside linebacker position, but eventually practiced at “sam” outside spot as well; he returned to linebacker from the safety position, where he had moved to (from linebacker) as a sophomore.

2012 (Soph.) – He saw action in nine games (no starts), all on special teams and in one on defense.  He was in for 16 snaps against Oregon, where he made four tackles, three of which were solo stops that included a tackle for zero gain and a third down stop.  He finished fourth on the team in special team points with 18, on the strength of five tackles (two solo, two inside-the-20), six knockdown blocks, two forced fair catches, a caused penalty, a first downfield credit that altered the path of the return and a forced fumble.  He moved from safety to linebacker during the spring, eventually settling on the outside.

2011 (Fr.) – He saw action in eight games, five on defense (no starts).  In 78 plays from scrimmage, he had eight tackles (four solo), with a third down stop and pass broken up.  He played in the season opener on special teams, appearing in his native Hawai’i.  He saw the bulk of his defensive play against Oregon, when he was in for 56 plays; he had six tackles, three solo, with the third down stop and PBU; he had two tackles the next game at Arizona State.

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RICHARD YATES – Defensive back

Recruiting: An invited walk-on from Kent high school in Denver; first-team All-State 2A as both a quarterback and a safety

Graduation status: May, 2014 – no degree listed

Career at Colorado:

2014 (Junior) – (Yates is a junior in eligibility but a senior in school. He has decided to forego his final year of eligibility, and play as a senior in 2014). Yates has seen action in every game this fall, mostly on special teams, and 33 games overall in his CU career. He is seventh on the team in special teams points, with 13 points, including four tackles and eight knockdown or springing blocks on kick returns. Due to the decimated secondary, Yates saw his first action as a defensive back this fall. His first game ever was against Arizona. Yates was in for 38 plays, and made five unassisted tackles.

2013 (Soph.) – He saw action in all 12 games, all on special teams; he tied for third on the team with 15 points in CU’s elaborate special teams scoring system.  He was in on four tackles (one solo) and had 11 knockdown blocks on the kickoff return unit which helped clear the path for additional yardage.

2012 (Fr.-RS) – He saw action in 10 games on special teams, but did not get in on defense.  He recorded six knockdown blocks on return unit duty to help clear the way for the return man.  He had seven tackles (three solo) in the main spring scrimmages but missed the spring game with a mild knee sprain.

2011 (Fr.)Redshirted; practiced the entire fall in the secondary.  An invited walk-on, he joined team for August camp.

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Note … The 2010 – 2013 career highlights for each player courtesy of the roster section at cubuffs.com

3 Replies to “A Tribute to the 2014 Seniors”

  1. Stuart:

    I appreciate this column as well. It is great to read about these kids. We all really appreciate the effort they gave during their careers and wish them the best in their future endeavors.

    Dick

  2. Stuart:

    I enjoy very much reading the profiles of these young Buffs. Thank you for writing them. As kids, a lot of us dream of being star athletes and in the movie that plays on a continuous loop in our mind’s eye, we make big plays in big games and compete for championships. For this group, the real-life version of the film has not played out that way. For any of them who red-shirted along the way, they played for three different coaching staffs. On-field successes proved to be few and far between.

    For most of these young men, the end of their Buff career will mark the end of their football career. It pleases me to read of degrees already earned and degrees on pace to be earned in May 2015 as it suggests to me they are ready “for the next level”.

    All any of us can really control is the effort we put into what we do. Generally speaking, the outcome is beyond our control. This group of 21 has not enjoyed a great deal of success while following Ralphie out onto the turf at Folsom. But each of them has given an honest, best effort. For that, this alumni thanks them and wishes them well.

    Shoulder to Shoulder Gentlemen. Shoulder to Shoulder.

    Happy Thanksgiving Stuart & thanks again.

    Adam

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